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Recipes that include eggs

Shrimp Bibimbop

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

This is not a traditional bibimbop, but I think of bibimbop as one of those “everything but the kitchen sink” recipes. I make it when I’ve got a bunch of random vegetables I want to use up and I want it all to amount to a one-bowl meal. Most commonly, bibimbop has bulgolgi, a Korean marinated beef. I didn’t have any beef so this one uses shrimp. I didn’t have any bean sprouts, but that’s ok. Traditionally, it’s an egg with runny yolk but Lon doesn’t like those so I chose to make a thin omelet and slice it up. See how flexible it is? I feel like every college kid should learn the jist of bibimbop because it’s an easy way to make a healthy meal. Where I use water convolous, you can use spinach or any greens. Instead of shrimp, try chicken, pork, or beef. If you prefer, use brown rice. You get the idea…All you need is the red pepper sauce (gochu chang) and it’ll be delicious!

Shrimp close-up 2

Shrimp Bibimbop
~4 servings

Red Pepper Sauce

  • 3/4 cup hot red pepper paste
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil

Toppings

  • 1 cup julienne carrots
  • 5+ teaspoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 2 cups julienne zucchini
  • 8 cups water convolous, stems and leaves seperated into 5″ to 6″ segments
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 8 scallions, cut in 3″ segments (cut thicker parts in half lengthwise)
  • 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons kecap manis
  • 32 medium shrimp, peeled and deveined and tails removed
  • kosher salt and white pepper
  • 4 cups steamed white rice
  • garnish with roasted seaweed and sesame seeds (optional)

Instructions –

1. Make the red pepper paste by stirring the ingredients together in a small bowl. Set aside.

Korean Red Pepper Sauce

2. Throw carrots in boiling water for just a few seconds. Remove and rinse with cold water. Drain. Set aside.

3. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a large flat pan on medium heat. Pour in egg mixture and swirl to coat the bottom. As soon as the bottom is solid, try to flip it over. It should finish in 2 seconds. Remove from heat immediately. When it cools enough to handle. Slice it in long strips. Set aside.

sliced egg

4. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a wok on high heat. Toss in zucchini with some salt and pepper. Toss around just until tender. Remove to a bowl and set aside.

5. Return wok to heat with 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the stems of the convolous with minced garlic and salt. Toss around until tender. Add the leaves with a little more salt. Toss around until leaves wilt. Remove from heat to a bowl and set aside.

6. Use that same wok again with just a light coating of oil. Add scallions and sliced garlic with kecap manis. Toss around just until the scallion has softened a bit but is not mushy. Remove from heat to a bowl and set aside.

7. Rinse the wok and return to the flame to dry it. Once it starts smoking, add 1 teaspoon oil. Swirl it around and add the shrimp. Add 1 tablespoon of the red pepper sauce and toss to coat the shrimp. Stir around until the shrimp curl up and there’s no more grey. (It’s a little bit hard to see in this dish with the red pepper sauce.) Remove from heat immediately. Set aside.

8. Divide rice into 4 bowls. Divide each topping into the 4 bowls, keeping each topping in a neat pile and put the shrimp in the center. Top with seaweed and sesame if you want. Serve with red pepper sauce on the side for each person to add as much as they want.

Shrimp Bibimbop 4

Usually the dish is served as pictured above, then the person eating it will add sauce and stir it all up.

Mixed Shrimp Bibimbop 2

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Mascarpone Cream Puffs

Friday, July 24, 2009

Summer is all about light and airy desserts and this is as perfect as it gets. Cream puffs are traditionally stuffed with pastry cream, but this mascarpone cream is lighter and easier to make, a win-win situation. I’m taking these to a barbecue tomorrow so I’ll pack the pate a choux (the puff) in one box and bring the mascarpone cream in a seperate container. I’ll bring a piping bag and a star tip (light and easy to travel with) and fill these to order. I’m pretty sure these will be popular with the kids, but impress the adults as well.

Mascarpone Cream Puff with Strawberry

So throughout the post, I will keep insisting that you fill the cream puffs as close to service as possible. You will definitely get the best results that way because any cream inside will start to moisten the pate a choux. The longer it is filled, the more soggy it will be. However, lots of places that sell cream puffs do not fill to order. It’s ok for most people. I guess I’m just really picky. So, if you are going to fill them, you must store them in the fridge, and your best bet is this recipe because this Mascarpone Cream is not as wet as pastry cream.

Mascarpone Cream Puffs

Pate a Choux (based on recipe from Professional Baking)
~roughly 36 pieces

  • 10 ounces water
  • 1 stick (4 oz) unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 6 ounces bread flour
  • 6 ounces eggs (about 3 large eggs), beaten lightly

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

2. Combine water, butter, sugar and salt in a large heavy saucepan. Bring to a rolling boil. Remove from the heat and all all the flour at once and stir quickly with a large whisk.

3. Return to medium heat and whisk vigorously until the dough forms a ball.

4. Transfer dough to a stand mixer bowl and mix with paddle attachment to cool to 140 degrees F, which is pretty warm but not hot.

choux batter

5. On medium speed, beat in about 1/4 of the egg at a time and wait till the egg is completely absorbed before adding more.

6. Use a round tip (I used 1/3″) and fill pastry bag with choux paste (the batter you just made). Pipe 1 1/2″ balls about 2″ apart. Try not to leave a tip but if you do, it’s easy to fix. When you’re done piping all the choux, dab your finger in a little water an just gently press the tips down.

choux paste 3 choux paste 2

7. Bake for 10 minutes in 425 degrees F, then rotate pans and turn down to 375 degrees F.  Bake for another 15-20 minutes, or until pate a choux are golden and feel hollow. Remove from oven and cool in a dry place.

choux puffs
Make-ahead:

You can make the pate a choux a few days a head of time. Cool completely before storing them in an air-tight container. When you are ready to use them, heat them up at 300 degrees F, in the oven. It takes a few minutes. You want them to feel light and dry. Remove them from the oven and let them cool completely before filling. Fill as close to eating as possible.

pate a choux pate a choux split open

Mascarpone Cream

  • 1 1/2 cups mascarpone
  • scant 1/2 cup chilled heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar

Instructions –

Chill mixer bowl and whisk for at least 15 minutes. Put all of the ingredients in the bowl and beat until stiff peaks (doesn’t take long).

Assembly:

Spit pate a choux in half. It pulls apart easily with your fingers but feel free to use a knife if you prefer. Pipe Mascarpone cream into bottom half.

Mascarpone Piped on Pate a Choux 2

Place top half on and press gently, just so it sticks. Serve immediately.

Mascarpone Cream Puff Macro 2

Another serving option is to add a few slices of fresh strawberry. Garnish with mint (optional). Both ways are light and delicious!

Mascarpone Cream Puff with Strawberries and Mint 4

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Strawberries and Fiori di Sicilia Cream

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Strawberries in Fiori di Sicilia Cream

I bought a little bottle of Fiori di Sicila from King Arthur. It was one of those times where you see   something and go, hmm…what’s that? …and then of course, I have to try it. It’s described as a combination of citrus and vanilla, which is pretty accurate, and recommended as an alternative to vanilla extract. It’s used in Panettone and when I tasted it, that’s exactly what came to mind. So with this, you can make anything taste like Panettone. For my first use, I wanted something simple so that I could really taste what it was all about. I decided on Pastry Cream, using a recipe from the Tartine cookbook as the basis.

Fiori di Sicila Cream

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Fiori di Sicilia
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch (use 4 for thicker pastry cream)
  • 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into tablespoons

Instructions –

1. Set a fine mesh sieve over a bowl and set aside.

2.  Whisk together cornstarch and sugar in a large glass bowl. Whisk in the eggs until smooth. Set aside.

3. Heat the milk, Fiori di Sicilia, and salt over medium high heat until it just starts to bubble at the edges (not boiling). Remove from heat.

4. While whisking vigorously, slowly ladle milk into cornstarch/egg mixture until 1/3 of milk is incorporated. Pour the egg/milk mixture back into the pot of milk and whisk over medium heat until that custard has thickened. It needs to start to bubble but can’t boil vigorously or it will curdle. Pour through sieve into bowl (that you prepared in step 1) immediately.

5. Let it cool for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. When the cream reaches 140 degrees F, add butter, 1 tablespoon at a time, whisking until smooth between each addition. Cover the cream with plastic wrap flush against the surface of the cream. Refrigerate. Do not whisk chilled cream. It can be kept in the fridge for 5 days.

Fiori di Sicilia Cream 2

I suggest serving with strawberries, for a light and summer-y dessert.

Strawberry dipped in Fiori di Sicilia Cream 2

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Summer Squash Chili with White Cheddar Cornbread

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Summer Squash Chili with White Cheddar Cornbread 5

My friend Emily has been studying for the New York State Bar Exam and decided to spend her birthday studying in Washington Square Park. She had this great idea, inviting friends to join her in the park, to study or read a book, or just say hi. Of course, I wanted to bring her some food. It’s really the best or only way I know how to say Happy Birthday!

(more…)

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Dark Chocolate, Macadamia Nut, and Ginger Biscotti

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

I was determined to use this sweetened ginger I got a little while ago. I don’t know why I bought it but I guess I just do that whenever I see something new. It’s similar to the concept of crystallized ginger but it seems to be made with confectioner’s sugar instead of granulated sugar.

Sweetened ginger

(more…)

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Little Lime Curd Cookies

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

I had this recipe for Petite Lemon Curd Cookies bookmarked since way way back. It was actually physically bookmarked in my December 2003 edition of Gourmet magazine. I used to collect lots of food magazines and even though I no longer subscribe (my last issue was January 2006), I can’t bear to throw them away. I know that all the Gourmet and Bon Appetit recipes are available on-line, but there’s something special about these magazines to me. They signify the time in my life when I decided to break free of the Chinese-American mold (I was told I would be an attorney since birth) and devote my life to food. There have definitely been some tough times. Working with food is not very lucrative, and I’ll certainly never make what I could have as a lawyer, but as I finished up these pictures and sat down for a few afternoon cookies, I felt completely at peace and in place. I know this is what I was meant for.

Little Lime Curd Cookies

(more…)

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Lavender Cupcakes with Lime Glaze

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Honestly, I hate lavender. There’s so few ingredients I don’t like but this is one. When my friend Fion requested lavender for her birthday, I got a bit nervous. I’ve never worked with lavender and since I dislike it, I wasn’t sure if I would be able to tell if my final product tasted right. I convinced myself that I should muster up the courage, and it wasn’t all that bad. I found fresh lavender at the farmer’s market, and I was lucky to find one with little purple flowers that I could decorate with. (Some varieties of lavender in the market didn’t have flowers.) I adapted from a well reviewed recipe to be safe and I think these turned out to be lovely little birthday cakes.

Lavender Cupcakes

Lavender Cupcakes with Lime Glaze
~makes about 14 cupcakes

  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh lavender leaves
  • 6 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup confectioner’s sugar, sifted
  • 2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice

Instructions –

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line muffin tin with paper liners.

2. Heat milk and lavender in a small pot just until it starts to simmer. Remove from heat and set aside.

lavender and milk

3. Cream together butter and sugar. (You can do it by hand of stand mixer.) Add eggs and beat until well combined.

4. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder, and salt. Mix 1/3 of the flour mixture into the butter/sugar/egg mixture, then half of the milk, another third of flour, the rest of the milk, and the last third of flour. If you are using a stand mixer, stop using the mixer for the last addition of flour. Fold it in by hand, just until mixed.

5. Spoon into muffin cups, about 2/3 full. Bake for 12-15 minutes or untl toothpick comes out clean. Allow to cool in the pans for 5 minutes. Remove to wired racks and cool completely before topping with glaze.

Lavender Cupcake before baking Lavender Cupcakes 2

6. To make the glaze, stir lime juice into confectioner’s sugar, until smooth. Put cupcakes on a wire rack with something to catch drippings underneath. Spoon the glaze over the cupcakes and garnish with lavender flowers.

Lavender Cupcake 2

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Strawberry-Rhubarb Cheesecake

Monday, June 8, 2009

This weekend, we headed off to visit family in New Jersey. One of my aunts makes some Taiwanese specialties that you seldom see here and she was going to show me some stuff. (More about that in future posts.) We could not arrive without some delicious offerings of our own so we decided on a seasonal cheesecake. It was a fun collaborative dessert. Lon made the cheesecake (because he is the cheesecake master) and I made the topping.

strawberry rhubarb cheesecake 2

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Herb Parpadelle with Ground Bison

Sunday, June 7, 2009

While talking to my mom on the phone earlier today, she asked what I was up to.  I said, “Just making some pasta.”  Mom asked, “Fresh pasta?”  And I said, “Yea, I’m making some herb parpadelle for Jessica.”  “Oh funny,” Mom said, “I just saw Joanne Weir making something like that on TV.”  Not so weird, I replied.  I saw the same show and that’s what inspired me.  Actually, the show was a bit bizarre.  The interaction between the older Weir and the younger guy she was teaching was just weird.  First, he seemed like a male bimbo, a mimbo.  And she was half-brooding and half-cougaresque.  Getting past the oddity, the dishes looked delish.

Greek Oregano and Catnip

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Chinese Warm Toss Salad

Saturday, June 6, 2009

When I was a little kid, we had this dish at Peking Duck House and we loved it, so my mom started making it at home. I’ve still never seen it anywhere else, and it’s definitely one of my favorite dishes on Earth! (BTW, this dish and the Peking Duck are the only good dishes at Peking Duck House. Do not get anything else.) I looked it up on their website, and they call the dish, Assorted Meat w. Vegetable w. Tiensin Mung Bean Sheets. That’s kind of long and I don’t like the sound of it. My mom has been calling it Luke-Warm Toss (in Chinese) for years because it’s a dish served at that temperature so I’ll go with something like that.

Chinese Warm Toss Salad 2

*above photo added 7/23/13

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