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Recipes that include instant yeast

Bagels

Thursday, September 24, 2009

I don’t have a very compelling argument for making bagels at home. If you live in New York, amazing bagels are cheap and available. Making a good bagel at home requires buying two ingredients you probably don’t have, malt (malt syrup is available at Whole Foods and malt powder is available at King Arthur) and unbleached high gluten flour (available at King Arthur Flour). If you think you’re going to do most of the kneading in your Kitchen-aid. Wrong. That’s what I thought until the engine of my Professional Series 6 Quart started smoking, and then it took me about 20 minutes of heavy kneading. First I was cursing, then praying, then wishing I was stronger. Taller would have helped with more leverage over the strong dough. (Actually, it feels like some hunky biceps by the time it’s done.)

black sesame bagel with The Bread Baker's Apprentice 3

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Big Burger Buns

Monday, August 31, 2009

Hamburger Buns 2

Sure burger buns are easy to buy, but they’re not that hard to make. You’d be surprised by how little work this is, and you’ll get hot springy buns that are irresistibly pinch-able. These burger buns,  which I’ve adapted from King Arthur, have the perfect tight crumb that will hold up better than any store bought and not get soggy. Yet it’s still tender and you’ll still bite right through with the burger patty and all your toppings. The mellow onion flavor is a subtle hint to your guests; this is more than just another white bread.

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Garlic Knots – For Superior Garlic Breath

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

When I was in High School, I thought garlic knots were the best things on earth. I guess I still kind of think that, but often I’m disappointed by the garlic knots I buy. I’m not sure if the quality of garlic knots has gone down in NYC or if I’ve become harder to please. These days, they are often hard and dry, probably from being left around too long. As with all bread-based goodies, the freshest way to get it is out of your own oven.

Garlic Knot

These really are a reasonable amount of work, and easily doubled, tripled, or quadrupled for even more return. You’ll definitely want to increase the recipe, seeing as how I ate all of it in just minutes after taking the pictures. (I was debating whether I should post this because Lon will see that I didn’t save him any.)

Garlic Knots

I’m assuming that pizzerias make their garlic knots with the same dough that they make pizza with, so use any pizza dough that you like. My recipe is based on the pizza dough recipe from The Bread Bible, by Rose Levy Beranbaum, and these are the best garlic knots ever! I may never buy any again.

Garlic Knot 2

Garlic Knots
~12-13 knots

  • 3/4 cup +1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon table salt
  • 1/3 cup water at room temperature (70 to 90 degrees)
  • 5 1/2 teaspoon olive oil, divided
  • 4 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 packed tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Instructions –

1. Whisk together flour, sugar, and yeast in a small bowl. Whisk in salt last (preventing direct contact with yeast). Make a well in the center and pour in water. Stir together to moisten the flour, just until dough begins to form, about 20 seconds. The dough will look shaggy and bumpy, not smooth.

2. Pour 4 teaspoons oil in a 2-cup sized bowl or cup (bigger if you are increasing recipe size). Place dough in and turn to coat. Cover tightly and rest on the counter until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

dough resting

3. Place a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees F at least 30 minutes before baking. Meanwhile, stir together 1/2 teaspoon olive oil, garlic, and kosher salt in a large bowl (you’ll see why later). Set aside.

4. When the dough is ready, place it on a board and gently press into a 10″ x 6″ rectangle. There will be left-over oil in the cup/bowl that the dough was rising in. Spread that oil over a baking sheet.

pizza dough

5. Spread half of the garlic mixture across the rectangle dough. Cut into 3/4″ strips (6″ long).

pizza dough with garlic

6. Tie any type of knot and lay on baking sheet with about 2″ space in between. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden. Meanwhile, add the remaining teaspoon of olive oil and parsley to the garlic mixture. Stir.

un-baked Garlic Knot dough

7. When garlic knots are done baking, toss in the garlic and parsley mixture and serve immediately.

Garlic Knot 5

Now, excuse me, I have to go buy some mints.

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Pretzel Dogs and Stuffed Pretzels

Monday, June 15, 2009

I am in love with fresh pretzels and it seems you are too, guessing from the popularity of our Mixer Made Soft Pretzels post. We decided to play with this great recipe again, making some really fun stuff that will have you feeling like a kid at a carnival again.

pretzel dog 2

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Homemade Rolls

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

We wandered through the supermarket browsing various rolls and breads, looking for something suitable to hold some Italian sausages we were planning to make. But while we love bread, sodium stearoyl lactylate, diammonium phosphate, and other chemicals don’t excite us.  We decided to make our own.

soft and chewy rolls

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Whole Wheat Quicker No-Knead Bread

Thursday, May 14, 2009

I started making Quicker No-Knead Bread when I realized, poop, I don’t have 3 cups of bread flour left. Grrr…I used what I had and then decided on whole wheat flour for the rest. I had been wanting to try a whole wheat version but didn’t have the guts, cause I knew I would cry if the bread didn’t come out well. I need my bread! Forced into this experimentation, I’m happy to report that this No-Knead method is resilient and you can substitute a bit of whole wheat in there. I thought it was very little whole wheat but it did make a significant difference in taste and look. There’s little specks of brown that give it an even more rustic look and the light taste of whole wheat is a nice change. I think the holes might be smaller too.

Whole Wheat Quicker No-Knead Bread 2*new photo added on 4/21/13

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Hot Cross Buns

Friday, April 10, 2009

Since Hot Cross Buns are traditionally made on Good Friday, we couldn’t miss out on that. Any excuse for food is a good excuse. Most commonly made with raisins or currants, ours are made with a mix of dried cranberries, dried blueberries, and raisins, adapted from a highly rated recipe on allrecipes.com, with the icing altered as well. Oh yea, and I’m lazy so I changed this into a mixer recipe where all the kneading is done by machine. Sing it with me now….Hot Cross Buns…Hot Cross Buns…

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Mixer Made Soft Pretzels

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Soft pretzels are so New York, and I wouldn’t be a responsible New Yorker if I didn’t post about pretzels. These are not like the street pretzels, but they are the best pretzels I’ve ever eaten, super soft and pillow-y with a bit of sweetness in the dough. I’ve adapted this recipe for a stand mixer so you don’t have to knead them by hand.

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Deep Dish Pizza

Sunday, February 8, 2009

Jessica has been wanting to make pizza all week. We stopped by Home Depot to buy some quarry tile to use as a pizza stone, but go figure, the Manhattan HDs don’t stock tile. So she decided on deep dish, as we don’t need a stone and because neither of us had really experimented much (at least in recent years) with deep dish.

CU on Baked Crust

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Maple Pecan Sticky Buns

Thursday, November 6, 2008

For Carol’s election party, the theme was comfort food. After about 3 days of thought, I decided to make Maple Pecan Sticky Buns (found on epicurious.com). Now, these are pretty work intensive (and there’s a huge clean-up) so take a look at this process before you decide to make these.

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