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Recipes that include pork

Sweet & Sour Spare Ribs

Monday, June 28, 2010

Sweet & Sour dishes are commonly known Chinese dishes. They’re probably even in the top 5 most popular. Yet, what I’ve seen at “fake” Chinese take-outs rarely resembles what I know of as Sweet & Sour. They’re often neon orange ( I don’t even know where that color comes from), taste like pure fried batter without meat, sweeter than a lollipop, or all three atrocities.

I’m not claiming that the real thing is healthy. It’s not. These spare ribs are deep-fried. There is still a lot of sugar, though I have to believe less than whatever “they” put. Plus, I know I’m still using meat. It is delicious, in addictive little chunks that work well as finger food at parties. Of course, Sweet & Sour Ribs goes over well with the kids too.

Sweet & Sour Spare Ribs 2

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Tee Pong: Red Cooked Picnic Shoulder

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

I spent Monday at mom’s house again and we decided, well I decided, that I wanted to learn my grandfather’s two favorite dishes. My grandpa, on my dad’s side, lived till he was 96! I remember what a bad example that set for us kids. He never ate veggies and yet he was as healthy as a pup, taking walks every day. Well, his walks were to Baskin Robbins.

Besides the Mint Chocolate Chip ice cream cone each day, his favorite dish was Tee Pong. It’s a Red-Cooked or Red-Braised Picnic Shoulder, and it’s all about the skin and fat. Brace yourself. The fat and skin can be more than an inch thick, and that’s the part my grandpa wanted to eat, sometimes leaving the meat behind.

Red Cooked Tee Pong (picnic shoulder)

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String Beans with Minced Pork

Thursday, May 20, 2010

So, two Chinese recipes in a row, and your going to get a lot more because I’m going to be hanging out at my mom’s house to cook. Why? Because she has a kitchen and I am going nuts! You know my kitchen renovation? We haven’t started yet! AHHHH!

So we had a general contractor, the same guy that did my mom’s kitchen. He did a beautiful job. He went to Taiwan and promised to be back by May 1st to start our kitchen. Guess what? He’s not coming back, at least for a while. For the past month, we’ve been looking for a new general contractor and man, it’s hard. What a weird bunch. Why do they waste the time to come see a potential job when they don’t plan on giving an estimate. Forget following up. Even if I ask again and again, they just keep saying, yea…I’ll get you an estimate tomorrow, or next week, but then nothing ever happens.

What the heck?

String Beans with Minced Pork 7

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Basic Mei Fun

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Since I don’t have a kitchen, I’ve been spending lots of time in my mom’s kitchen, which explains all the Chinese recipes up recently. Every time we get together to write down one of her recipes, we discuss which one we’ll do next time. As we brainstormed, my mom started thinking we shouldn’t do certain recipes because she felt like my non-Chinese audience might not like it. Things like tripe, pig feet, duck feet, pig ears, or innards might be unappetizing to some. Dishes with fermented flavors or unfamiliar textures might be hard to handle. I thought about it and decided that I want to share as much as I can, and you can decide which recipes you want to make, right?

plate of basic mei fun

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Hot & Sour Soup

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

I consider Hot & Sour Soup a stuffy nose remedy. Like wasabi, it instantly opens the flood gates, and for a heavenly 10 minutes after drinking this soup, you can breathe, through both nostrils if you’re lucky.

Hot & Sour Soup 5

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Za Jiang Mein

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Most American kids cannot imagine growing up without Spaghetti and Meat Sauce or Bolognese. For Chinese kids, it’s Za Jian Mein, Noodles with Pork Bean Sauce. It’s sweet and salty, with a chunky thick sauce that coats noodles so well, irresistible for kids, and a heaven sent for mom’s because it’s just too easy to make. It’s no wonder we ate this a gazillion times. We’d ask and before you know it, a piping hot bowl of noodles would be on the table.

Za Jiang Mein title pic

*above photo was added on 7/23/13

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Baby Back Ribs in Vietnamese Caramel Sauce

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Why can’t looking for apartments be as easy as looking for recipes? We’ve been looking for a place to move to, on and off, for two years now, with no end in sight. When I look for recipes, I find what I need most of the time. The two processes are actually quite similar. Step 1: narrow down search by criteria. Step 2: Try it out. This is where they start to diverge and force a completely different step 3, and that’s where apartment hunting becomes my least favorite activity now.

Baby Back Rib in Vietnamese Caramel Sauce 2

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Stuffed Peppers with Black Bean Sauce

Saturday, October 24, 2009

Marc at No Recipes started Blog Away Hunger, a way for us to contribute to a great cause while cooking and blogging. The idea is to make a meal that is cheaper than your usual meal and donate the rest to World Food Programme. Easy!

I’ve been wanting to participate for a while now, but I’ve been waiting for the perfect recipe. I wanted it to be cheap (the cheaper it is, the more I can donate) and I wanted it to be a complete meal with protein, veggies, and carbs. It should be filling and delicious, a good cost-saving way to feed any family.  Growing up, my mother never let us leave the table without a balanced meal. We couldn’t pick out the veggies, or leave pieces of rice. She taught us early on not to waste. Taught may not be the right word there, more like beat it into our skulls. In any case, these Stuffed Peppers with Black Bean Sauce was always a favorite of my brother’s and this complete meal is so cheap to make. I’m estimating $4.50 for 2 people: $3 for peppers, $1 for ground pork, 50 cents worth or sauce and rice. I don’t know how much we usually spend on meals. It really varies, but let’s say $20 for the two of us, so I’ll be donating $15.50. Don’t forget to check out Marc’s page on Blog Away Hunger.

Stuffed Peppers with Black Bean Sauce 6

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White Sliced Pork

Monday, July 6, 2009

This dish was developed by the Chinese to keep away vampires. I’m totally kidding, but it has some serious garlic in here and it’s fresh garlic which gives it that bite. Bi Che Ro literally translated means White Sliced/Cut Meat, and it’s simply that with a pungent fresh garlic sauce.

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Kelly’s Lion’s Head Casserole

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Lion’s Head Casserole is a traditional pork meatball dish that every Chinese kid is familiar with. It’s definitely Chinese comfort food. There are so many variations of this recipe out there from different regions and just varying family tradition. Most use some sort of filler, bread, breadcrumbs, or tofu, but my mom’s version doesn’t. She said that my brother and I preferred it this way as kids. She also says that if you use tofu, it must be eaten within two days or the meatballs will get a little sour. In any variation, this is a great make-ahead meal. I think it actually tastes better the next day.

Lion's Head Casserole 3

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