Recipe Index (by Ingredients)

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Recipes that include scallion

Lion’s Head Casserole

Sunday, August 1, 2010

Lion’s Head Casserole is a simple dish of pork meatballs and napa cabbage. The meatballs supposedly look like lion’s heads, which is a stretch, I know, but that is the name. Last week, I wasn’t feeling that great and got in that I want my mommy mood. (Yes, I’m 30.) I whined and asked my mom to make me a pot of this umami-powered dish that feels so nurturing. It feels mommy-made. I took pictures and notes, not remembering that I already posted this dish over a year ago.

I decided that it was worth re-posting for the new pics and some added thoughts. It’s interesting to compare the notes since my mom does not ever use recipes. It’s amazingly similar in making the meat mixture, but you’ll notice that you can vary the size of the meatballs if you want.

Lion's Head Casserole 2

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West Lake Beef Soup

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Lon’s grandma Rose loves Chinese food. Her favorite course is soup and her most favorite Chinese soup is Egg Drop Soup. Her doctors want her to lay off the sodium so Lon’s family hasn’t been taking her to the Chinese restaurants she used to frequent; and of course, that made her sad — I think we can all relate to being told not to eat something. So this week, when I went to cook with my mom, I asked to learn one of my favorite soups: Shi Hu Neo Ro Gung. This translates to West Lake Beef Soup.

I thought Grandma Rose would like to try this authentic Chinese soup (rarely known by the non-Chinese) because it has a white egg drop in it, as well as little bits of beef, so she can get a little more nutrition. We made it low sodium for her and packed individual containers that could be heated easily in the microwave.

East Lake Beef Soup in stacked bowls 2

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Tee Pong: Red Cooked Picnic Shoulder

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

I spent Monday at mom’s house again and we decided, well I decided, that I wanted to learn my grandfather’s two favorite dishes. My grandpa, on my dad’s side, lived till he was 96! I remember what a bad example that set for us kids. He never ate veggies and yet he was as healthy as a pup, taking walks every day. Well, his walks were to Baskin Robbins.

Besides the Mint Chocolate Chip ice cream cone each day, his favorite dish was Tee Pong. It’s a Red-Cooked or Red-Braised Picnic Shoulder, and it’s all about the skin and fat. Brace yourself. The fat and skin can be more than an inch thick, and that’s the part my grandpa wanted to eat, sometimes leaving the meat behind.

Red Cooked Tee Pong (picnic shoulder)

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Dried Sardines with Bean Curd

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

In Chinese, sometimes we describe a dish as sha fan. The literal translation is down rice, and what we mean is that it goes down well with rice. It pairs so well with rice that it encourages the eating of more rice. These are usually addictive, salty or spicy foods, and the Dried Sardines with Bean Curd is both. I think of this dish as a confetti of aromatics: fish, ginger, garlic, scallion, and fermented black beans. Just sprinkle a little on rice and it goes a long long way.

I love the fishes1

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Basic Mei Fun

Sunday, March 28, 2010

Since I don’t have a kitchen, I’ve been spending lots of time in my mom’s kitchen, which explains all the Chinese recipes up recently. Every time we get together to write down one of her recipes, we discuss which one we’ll do next time. As we brainstormed, my mom started thinking we shouldn’t do certain recipes because she felt like my non-Chinese audience might not like it. Things like tripe, pig feet, duck feet, pig ears, or innards might be unappetizing to some. Dishes with fermented flavors or unfamiliar textures might be hard to handle. I thought about it and decided that I want to share as much as I can, and you can decide which recipes you want to make, right?

plate of basic mei fun

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Vegetarian Za Jiang Mein

Friday, March 12, 2010

Since I posted my mom’s recipe for Za Jiang Mein (a Chinese staple I could not live without), I’ve promised to post my mom’s vegetarian version. I know it took forever (four months), but all good things come to those that wait, right? Well, this is a good thing, a very good thing. Plus, you will not get this anywhere else. Though every Chinese family has a recipe for Za Jiang Mein (always made with pork), this Vegetarian Za Jiang Mein is my mom’s own recipe that she developed herself. I guess the apple doesn’t fall from the tree.  She’s often creating new dishes or figuring out a restaurant dish. She doesn’t write her own blog though, so this is the only place you’ll get a Kelly Lee recipe.

Vegetarian Za Jiang Mein

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Abalone and Oyster Amuse

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

I hope no one is deterred by the word amuse, short for amuse bouche. It literally translates to mouth amuser, basically a one-bite hors d’oeuvres that is a gift from the chef. It can be as easy or as complicated as you want it to be, and you can really make just about anything into an amuse, even left-over meatloaf cut into 1″ cubes. It just has to be served in a one bite portion. Start off your next dinner party with an amuse and everyone will think you’re so fancy, when all it was, was a slice of prosciutto wrapped around a chunk of melon on a toothpick.

set of three Abalone and Oyster Amuse 7

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Bacon Clam Dip

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Everyone serves some kind of dip for Superbowl right?

I looked around at some clam dip recipes and they were all as easy as can be, basically just dump and stir. But, would you be willing to add two little steps, just two easy teensy weensy things? In my opinion, you’ll get more back than you put in, and your guests will know that you did more than just dump and stir.

bacon clam dip in bread bowl 6

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Zucchini Cous Cous

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

I wonder if anyone else hates winter as much as I do? I don’t mean to be all negative but winter just kills it for me. Since this is a food blog, I won’t go into details about my skin drying and cracking, the headaches from wind blowing at my head (this is NOT psychological), and my seasonal affective disorder. However, I feel entitled to go off on a rant about how terrible New York produce is in winter. I’m going through tomato withdrawal, daydreaming about cracking open fresh pea pods, and cursing at the boxes labeled “raspberries”. As I stared at the emptiness in the farmer’s market, I thought to myself, that’s enough, I can’t just eat apples and celery root all winter.

forkful of Zucchini Cous Cous

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Fancy Crab Fried Rice

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

There are so many versions of fried rice. I’m not even going to try and guess how many there are. Yet, what makes it a fried rice? My mom once told me that the very basic Chinese version is just scallion, egg, and rice. That’s all you need for fried rice and any other additions are your choice.

Fancy Crab Fried Rice 4

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