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Recipes that include seaweed

Kids Sushi Rolls

Thursday, July 22, 2010

For every picnic, every class trip, every water park day, and every opportunity for packed lunch, I asked my mom for sushi. Little did I know then that the “sushi” my mom made for me is not what most would call sushi. When we think of sushi and maki rolls, we usually think of the Japanese kind or the Americanized-Japanese kind. Well, the Koreans and Chinese make sushi rolls as well, mostly without the use of raw fish. These rolls are stuffed with raw or cooked vegetables, sometimes egg, sometimes pickles.

My mom decided to make her own version for me and my brother (this is a Kelly Lee original), one with ingredients that would be safe in room temperature and carried off to school or the park. It’s easily packable finger food with the perfect balance of sweet and salty: pork floss, jang gua (Chinese pickles), and fried gluten. We loved it so much that we begged her to make these rolls constantly, and then of course our cousins tried it, our friends tried it, and all the kids would scream for it. Sometimes my mom would have to make these continuously all day as we played.

Sushi for kids


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Garlicky Seaweed Knots

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Most people are more familiar with the seaweed salad at Japanese restaurants, but there’s also a Taiwanese seaweed salad that is extra garlicky, with the tang of sweet and sour. At Taiwanese restaurants, I usually see this dish made with seaweed strips, which is how my mom started making it when we were kids. At some point, she decided to use seaweed knots instead and I liked it even more. It’s extra bouncy where the knot is and I get pretty addicted to the chewing of them.

Garlicky Seaweed Knots 2


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Shrimp Bibimbop

Tuesday, August 4, 2009

This is not a traditional bibimbop, but I think of bibimbop as one of those “everything but the kitchen sink” recipes. I make it when I’ve got a bunch of random vegetables I want to use up and I want it all to amount to a one-bowl meal. Most commonly, bibimbop has bulgolgi, a Korean marinated beef. I didn’t have any beef so this one uses shrimp. I didn’t have any bean sprouts, but that’s ok. Traditionally, it’s an egg with runny yolk but Lon doesn’t like those so I chose to make a thin omelet and slice it up. See how flexible it is? I feel like every college kid should learn the jist of bibimbop because it’s an easy way to make a healthy meal. Where I use water convolous, you can use spinach or any greens. Instead of shrimp, try chicken, pork, or beef. If you prefer, use brown rice. You get the idea…All you need is the red pepper sauce (gochu chang) and it’ll be delicious!

Shrimp close-up 2

Shrimp Bibimbop
~4 servings

Red Pepper Sauce

  • 3/4 cup hot red pepper paste
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil


  • 1 cup julienne carrots
  • 5+ teaspoons vegetable oil, divided
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 2 cups julienne zucchini
  • 8 cups water convolous, stems and leaves seperated into 5″ to 6″ segments
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 8 scallions, cut in 3″ segments (cut thicker parts in half lengthwise)
  • 4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons kecap manis
  • 32 medium shrimp, peeled and deveined and tails removed
  • kosher salt and white pepper
  • 4 cups steamed white rice
  • garnish with roasted seaweed and sesame seeds (optional)

Instructions –

1. Make the red pepper paste by stirring the ingredients together in a small bowl. Set aside.

Korean Red Pepper Sauce

2. Throw carrots in boiling water for just a few seconds. Remove and rinse with cold water. Drain. Set aside.

3. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a large flat pan on medium heat. Pour in egg mixture and swirl to coat the bottom. As soon as the bottom is solid, try to flip it over. It should finish in 2 seconds. Remove from heat immediately. When it cools enough to handle. Slice it in long strips. Set aside.

sliced egg

4. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a wok on high heat. Toss in zucchini with some salt and pepper. Toss around just until tender. Remove to a bowl and set aside.

5. Return wok to heat with 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the stems of the convolous with minced garlic and salt. Toss around until tender. Add the leaves with a little more salt. Toss around until leaves wilt. Remove from heat to a bowl and set aside.

6. Use that same wok again with just a light coating of oil. Add scallions and sliced garlic with kecap manis. Toss around just until the scallion has softened a bit but is not mushy. Remove from heat to a bowl and set aside.

7. Rinse the wok and return to the flame to dry it. Once it starts smoking, add 1 teaspoon oil. Swirl it around and add the shrimp. Add 1 tablespoon of the red pepper sauce and toss to coat the shrimp. Stir around until the shrimp curl up and there’s no more grey. (It’s a little bit hard to see in this dish with the red pepper sauce.) Remove from heat immediately. Set aside.

8. Divide rice into 4 bowls. Divide each topping into the 4 bowls, keeping each topping in a neat pile and put the shrimp in the center. Top with seaweed and sesame if you want. Serve with red pepper sauce on the side for each person to add as much as they want.

Shrimp Bibimbop 4

Usually the dish is served as pictured above, then the person eating it will add sauce and stir it all up.

Mixed Shrimp Bibimbop 2

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Vegetable Tamago Rolls

Monday, August 11, 2008

Last night, we threw together a bunch of things for dinner but it seemed so carb-heavy. I tried to conjure up a way to add protein and veggies to our meal and somehow this idea came to mind. I loved it so much that I decided to make it again for lunch, tweaking the recipe just a bit to make the rolls a bit smaller, and therefore easier to eat.


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