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Recipes that include sesame seeds

Crunchy Cranberry Salad

Sunday, March 14, 2010

Finally! We moved, but it’s not all smooth sailing yet. We’re living out of boxes and we don’t have a kitchen yet. While our perfect kitchen is being built (which we will be talking about soon), I’m going to have to get crafty. I do have many plug-in appliances (rice cooker, toaster oven, panini press, waffle maker, microwave, etc.) so we’re still going to have a ball here. I think we’re going to be pleasantly surprised with how much I (or you) can do without a kitchen. (Gulp) Determined to eat well every single day without exceptions, here goes…

As I packed up the kitchen at our last apartment, and cooked my last few meals, I started panicking a bit. Ok, a lot. I knew we wouldn’t have a kitchen for a while. But, as I started packing up our utility junk drawer, guess what I found inside?

Crunchy Cranberry Salad 6


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Chicken or Turkey Pasta Salad

Friday, November 27, 2009

One of my go-to recipes is a Chicken & Cucumber Pasta Salad that I posted way-way back. I’ve tweaked it and played with it many times, and you can too, though the reason I thought to post it now, is because it’s a great way to use up left-over Thanksgiving Turkey. The Asian flavors make it so drastically different, you won’t even recognize that ceremonial bird.

Chicken and Cucumber Pasta Salad


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Thursday, September 24, 2009

I don’t have a very compelling argument for making bagels at home. If you live in New York, amazing bagels are cheap and available. Making a good bagel at home requires buying two ingredients you probably don’t have, malt (malt syrup is available at Whole Foods and malt powder is available at King Arthur) and unbleached high gluten flour (available at King Arthur Flour). If you think you’re going to do most of the kneading in your Kitchen-aid. Wrong. That’s what I thought until the engine of my Professional Series 6 Quart started smoking, and then it took me about 20 minutes of heavy kneading. First I was cursing, then praying, then wishing I was stronger. Taller would have helped with more leverage over the strong dough. (Actually, it feels like some hunky biceps by the time it’s done.)

black sesame bagel with The Bread Baker's Apprentice 3


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Big Burger Buns

Monday, August 31, 2009

Hamburger Buns 2

Sure burger buns are easy to buy, but they’re not that hard to make. You’d be surprised by how little work this is, and you’ll get hot springy buns that are irresistibly pinch-able. These burger buns,  which I’ve adapted from King Arthur, have the perfect tight crumb that will hold up better than any store bought and not get soggy. Yet it’s still tender and you’ll still bite right through with the burger patty and all your toppings. The mellow onion flavor is a subtle hint to your guests; this is more than just another white bread.


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Korean Tacos

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

The LA based Kogi BBQ Truck, serving Korean Tacos, is so famous these days, we hear about it in New York. Sadly, it doesn’t seem like they’re hitting the big apple any time soon. But, I have received a message from a group of guys that are going to be launching their own Korean Taco Truck, The Krave, around Jersey City. More on that soon.

For now, feeling deprived of Korean Tacos, I whipped some up from my imagination. It’s a pretty simplistic take and perfect as an easy party solution.

Korean Beef Taco 3

Korean Tacos
~about 16 (5″) tacos

Red pepper sauce

  • 1/4 cup Korean red pepper paste
  • 1 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil


  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup chopped scallions
  • 1 lb ground beef

Peppers and Onions

  • 2 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced red onion
  • 1/4 cup sliced garlic
  • 1 large bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • kosher salt and white pepper


  • 14 to 16 (5″-6″) corn tortillas, warmed
  • sesame seeds for sprinkling

Instructions –

1. Make red pepper sauce by stirring together paste, sugar, and sesame oil. Set aside.

2. Make beef by heating the oil in a medium sized ceramic pot on medium high heat. Stir in scallions and mix for about a minute. Crumble in beef and brown while breaking it up with a wooden spoon. When you don’t see any pink left, mix in 1/4 cup of the red pepper sauce. Stir around for another minute. Remove from heat and set aside.

Korean Beef Taco Filling

3. To make vegetables, heat oil in a wok on high heat. Soften onions and garlic with a few pinches of salt. Add peppers and stir until softened but not mushy. Adjust seasoning.  Set aside.

Peppers and Onions

4. Spread a thin layer of red pepper sauce in the middle of each tortilla (optional). Scoop a generous amount of beef (2 to 3 tablespoons) onto each tortilla and top with peppers and onions. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Korean Beef Taco 8

You can also just set out bowls of each component and allow guests to assemble themselves.

Korean Beef Taco 4


You can buy corn tortillas or make them yourself. It’s pretty easy. We just bought instant corn masa flour and followed the directions on the bag.


You may have noticed the purple tinge on the peppers. Yup, it’s a purple bell pepper, which looses the darkness of the purple when you cook it but it still looks unique.

You can use any color pepper you want, even a spicy one if you want. They will have different tastes but I can’t imagine any one being bad.

purple pepper, scallon, onion, garlic

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Chilled Sesame Eggplant

Tuesday, September 9, 2008

I’ve been getting some requests for vegetarian friendly recipes and I’ll try to accommodate.

This recipe is inspired by the eggplant we had at Aquagrill. We had never had anything like it and since it’s been so long, I can’t really remember it exactly. What was amazing though, was the unique texture. It’s so soft, yet each piece holds itself together, while being unbelievably juicy. My best guess to achieving this texture was to steam the Chinese/Japanese Eggplant, marinate it, then chill it. I think that’s the method because it tasted pretty darn close. Lon can’t remember the eggplant from Aquagrill, but he really liked this one.

Chilled Sesame Eggplant


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I Attempted to Make Kalbi Tang

Wednesday, May 7, 2008

I’m not Korean but boy do I love Korean food. I get serious cravings for Kalbi-Tang and Duk Mandoo Guk when I’m sick. Unfortunately, my favorite place, I called the Secret Korean Grandma shop, closed, so I figured I had better learn how to make this stuff. I read a few Kalbi-Tang recipes on-line and ended up making it like this.


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Spring Soba Salad

Tuesday, April 22, 2008

Lon doesn’t really like soba but sometimes I like a challenge. He gave his thumbs up on this one and I loved it! It’s pretty darn easy too.


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Chicken and Cucumber Pasta Salad

Sunday, July 8, 2007

Salad, Pre-Tossed: Prepped for Travel

I went to Scott and Angie’s rooftop BBQ yesterday and Angie asked me if I could make my famous Chicken and Cucumber Pasta Salad. Of course, I agreed. It’s expected. Everyone who has tried it, requests that I make it for them. I’ve given friends the recipe but I don’t think anyone has made it yet. It is a bit work intensive, but the steps are easy and you get an impressively delicious summer pasta salad.


  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Salad, Dressing Tossed In: Ready for Service

Pasta Salad:

  • 1 box (1 lb) dry pasta (any shape)
  • 3 chicken legs, poached and chilled
  • 2 large cucumbers, seeded and thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 cup chopped scallion
  • 1/4 cup toasted sesame seeds


  1. Whisk all of the dressing ingredients together and set aside. (I usually do this the night before just to get it out of the way.)
  2. Cook pasta as instructed on the box. Drain and rinse with cold water. Set aside.
  3. Tear meat of the chicken legs and shred by hand (pulling meat apart following the natural strands). Set aside.
  4. Combine pasta, chicken, cucumber, cilantro, scallion, sesame seeds, and dressing. Toss well and serve.

All of the ingredients can be prepared the day before. Just don’t combine them until you’re ready to serve it.

For more images, check out the Flickr set.

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