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Recipes that include turmeric

Diabetes Cooking For Everyone

Friday, August 28, 2009

When I was asked to review  Diabetes Cooking For Everyone, by Carol Gelles, I couldn’t decide on which recipes to test. So, I left it up to you to vote for 3 out of 9 recipes. Here are the results:

  1. Afghan Lamb with Spinach – 49.1%
  2. Kasha with Walnuts and Mushrooms – 40.4%
  3. Chicken en Brochette with Orange Marmalade and Sherry Marinade – 35.1%

Before I get to reviewing the recipes where I will do my best to be objective, you should know that I cannot be completely objective about Carol. She is my friend and mentor. One day I will write a post all about her when I can gather up all the words I need to express my admiration, gratitude, and love. For this book, all you need to know is that she is an award winning (IACP/Julia Child Cookbook Award and James Beard Award) cookbook author , professionally trained nutritionist, and a type 2 diabetic.

*Recipes are shown here with Carol’s permission.

Afghan Lamb with Spinach 5


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Thursday, April 23, 2009

In preparation for our upcoming Grilled Cheese extravaganza, we need some awesome mustard.  As you may know from reading Jessica’s bio, she loves mustard.  And at the moment we probably have six or eight different store-bought mustards at home.

Yellow Mustard Seeds


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Shrimp over Linguine in Tangy Lobster Sauce

Saturday, December 6, 2008

Remember the lobster stock I made? It’s not that I haven’t been using it, it’s just that nothing I’ve made has been worth reporting, until tonight. I started reducing stock while I prepared the other ingredients.

Shrimp Linguine in Tangy Lobster Sauce Plated


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Unsquashing Squash Soup

Sunday, October 19, 2008

Squash Soup Ingredients

If the weather is not enough to let you know it’s Fall, the farmer’s market will. Every other stand has a beautiful selection of fall veggies, including many types of squash. After laughing about how some pumpkins were bigger than Ice (our dog); I picked up a butternut and a delicata. My goal was to make a glowing orange, fall soup that could shine above the rest, something to really get people excited about squash soup.

Jessica and I LOVE the finished product. It is perfect, seriously. The spice and fall flavors combine perfectly, this soup will make you feel warmed for the cool weather. While eating it, Jessica said she could imagine herself sitting in a log cabin, by a fire, drinking this soup.

Unsquashed Squash Soup
~ approximately 10 cups


  • ~8 cups roughly cubed Butternut Squash (1 good size squash)
  • ~2 cups roughly cubed Delicata Squash, (1 squash)
  • 2 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher Salt
  • Fresh Cracked Black Pepper
  • 6 ounces Bacon (3 thick-cut slices), cut in 1″ wide pieces
  • 1.5 cups roughly chopped Yellow Onion (2 small onions)
  • 1 cup roughly chopped Carrot (2 large carrots)
  • 1 cup roughly chopped Parsnip (1 parsnip)
  • 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon Turmeric Powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper Powder
  • 1/4 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1/8 teaspoon Allspice Powder
  • 8 cups Chicken Broth or Bouillon equivalent (room temp.)
  • 1 tablespoon Buckwheat Honey (or any dark honey)
  • 3 Roasted Pasilla Peppers, roughly chopped (seeded) (use Poblano if Pasilla not available)
  • 1/2 Lemon
  • 1″ of Ginger, peeled & roughly chopped
  • 2″ Cinnamon Stick
  • 1 teaspoon Black Peppercorns
  • 2 large Bay Leaves
  • Parsnip Leaves, rinsed and most of stems removed.


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Curried Cauliflower Soup

Thursday, December 6, 2007

Lon doesn’t really like cauliflower so I tried to make a not so cauliflower-like dish. It ended up being a yummy curry soup and Lon liked it. Yay! It tastes creamy without any dairy and has very little fat.

2 cubes chicken bouillon
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 medium onion, sliced
1 small head of cauliflower, cut into florets
8 red potatoes, quartered
1 1/2 tablespoons curry powder
1/2 teaspoon turmeric

*you can also use russet potatoes, red potatoes just happened to be what I had

1. Dissolve the bouillon cubes in 3 cups of boiling water. Set aside.
2. Heat the oil in a 3 1/2 quart pot.
3. Add the onions and saute for 2 minutes on medium heat.
4. Add cauliflower and saute for another 2 minutes.
5. Add chicken bouillon liquid and potatoes. Bring to a boil.
6. Add curry powder and turmeric and return to medium heat.
7. Continue cooking, uncovered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
8. Puree in a blender until very smooth. You will need to do it in two batches.
9. Serve or store.

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Beef, Korma-Style

Saturday, July 7, 2007

When looking upon the top sirloin that we had defrosted for dinner, I just didn’t feel like having it as a steak. For some reason it called to me as beef korma. While there are several recipes on AllRecipes for Korma, I decided to make my own.

Korma is a mild-curry dish that is prepared typically with yogurt and nuts. However, I don’t care for nuts in savory food (usually) and we only had either flavored (vanilla) or expensive (Fage) yogurt around, I had to improvise.

Ingredients (approx.)

  • 8oz Beef Steak (Lamb or Chicken could be used instead)
  • 1 tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 tbsp. Unsalted Butter
  • 1/2 cup Yellow Onion, roughly diced
  • 5 cloves Garlic, diced
  • 1 tsp. Cayenne Pepper
  • 1 tsp. Turmeric
  • 1 tsp. Cumin
  • 1 tsp. Garam Masala
  • 1 tsp. Ground Ginger
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 1/4 cup Half and Half (or heavy cream or yogurt)
  • 1/4 cup Frozen Peas

After cutting the steak in half, it was about 8oz; I seasoned it with kosher salt and then grilled it to barely rare.

While the steak was cooking, I heated a tablespoon extra virgin olive oil and a table spoon of unsalted butter in a saute pan over medium-low heat. I then added half of a large, yellow onion, roughly diced and seasoned with a pinch of kosher salt and a teaspoon of red pepper flakes (jalapeño slices would be good too). As the onions softened, I slowly added the key flavors of Korma, about one teaspoon each of: cayenne pepper, turmeric, cumin, garam masala, ground ginger, and a bay leaf; you could also add some coriander if you have it on hand, I didn’t. Then I tossed in five garlic cloves, sliced. You need to keep the heat low and the ingredients moving in the pan to avoid burning.

After the steak rested for a minute or two, and the sauce had been going for about eight minutes, I diced the steak into about one inch by half inch by half inch pieces. They were absolutely under-cooked inside, that’s what you want. I tossed these into the sauce along with about 1/4 cup of half and half and 1/4 cup of frozen peas, coating everything evenly.

Immediately after adding the peas, which will drop the temperature slightly, taste the sauce for seasoning. I decided mine needed more salt and black pepper. I cooked it for another minute, to bring the meat to medium (although medium rare would be nice too) and then plated along with seasoned rice: I used cilantro, ginger, and garlic in my rice.

The dish is mild and delicious. The red pepper flakes really added some pop to this normally simple dish, and it is was simple and fast to make. Enjoy!

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